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Welcome to the El Paso / Trans-Pecos Audubon Society!

We are a chapter of the National Audubon Society.  We have a large territory, all of Texas west of the Pecos River (the "Trans-Pecos").  Our members are found throughout the Trans-Pecos, but most live in the region's largest city, El Paso.  Birds, birding, wildlife, he environment, and our community are the concerns of the El Paso/Trans-Pecos Audubon Society. Please consider joining now!

 

Notes from the Field

hunt_n_peck

 

 Northern New Mexico and Jemez Mountains, August 29-September 1, 2014.  We had a group of 16 birders for the trip. Friday we birded the Los Alamos area, where we had a flock of Band-tailed Pigeons and a colony of Acorn Woodpeckers.  We went to Deer Trip Mesa, which was a beautiful view of the canyons of Los Alamos.  We finished the day up on Pajaritos Ski Area looking for the Three-toed Woodpecker.  There were lots of signs of them, but no sightings.  Saturday morning we left early for Espanola and the San Juan Bridge, where we had Cedar Waxwings, Yelllow-breasted Chat, Nashville Warbler, Blue Grosbeak, a Black-capped Chickadee and Belted Kingfisher.  We then traveled to the Santa Fe Ski Area, where we had a flock of Pinyon Jays right in the City of Santa Fe.  We ate lunch at the Ski Area where a few in our group rode on the gondola to the top and saw a Black-billed Magpie.  We did a small hike down the creek, where we got a Red-breasted Nuthatch, Mountain Chickadee, Downy Woodpecker and a Red-naped Sapsucker.  We returned to Los Alamos through Tesuque, which is a very pretty drive.  Saturday night we had a group dinner which was fun, with everyone talking about the day's activities.  Sunday morning we went to Bandelier National Monument, where there are cliff dwellings and kivas and ancient native american drawings.  Here we saw Olive-sided Flycatchers, Canyon Wren, Canyon Towhee, Western Tanager, Rock Wren and Western Bluebirds.  We had a picnic lunch near Jemez Springs and then headed into the Jemez Mountains where we walked in a meadow and we saw a Northern Goshawk, Townsend's Solitaire and White-breasted Nuthatch, and Northern Flickers.  We returned to Los Alamos and regrouped to go to the Valle Caldera for Elk watching.  We had good looks at lots of Elk, we heard them Bugle and we were able to watch two bulls fighting over some cows.  Monday morning we checked out of our hotels and drove to Randall Davey Audubon Center in Santa Fe.  They had their feeders up and we all took turns sitting and watching birds at feeders.  We had a lot of Hummingbirds (Rufus, Black-chinned, and Broad-tailed).  Several in the group went on a hike to the beaver ponds where Evening Grosbeak, Black-headed Grosbeak, Clark's Nutcracker, Lesser Goldfinch, Pine Siskins and Western Scrub Jays were seen. A birder, from Los Alamos, Joe Fitzgibbon, joined us for our trips and we appreciate his knowledge of the area and the birds; it was very helpful.  The weather for the trip was great and it was a fun trip.  We had 75 birds.

Belted Fingfisher (by D. Peveto)

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Upcoming Events

FIELD TRIPS

Saturday, November 15, 2014, Dripping Springs Natural Area. We will take an easy hike of approximately 1-1/2 miles birding up the Dripping Springs Trail to the old Sanatorium and the famous "Weeping Walls" in which a natural spring seeps out of the rock.  Bring a lunch and we'll picnic at La Cueva, which is Spanish for "the cave."  Time permitting, we will stop at Soledad Canyon.  There is a nominal fee per car at Dripping Springs.  We will meet at 7:00 a.m. at the southwest corner of the Outlet Mall parking lot, the entrance off of Talbot Road.  Beginners and nonmembers are welcome. Contact Mark Perkins 915-637-3521.

 

Monthly Meeting

 

Join us for our November Meeting and Program on Monday, November 17, 2014, 7:00 p.m., UTEP Centennial Museum at the corner of University and Wiggins.  Kelly Bryan of Fort Davis will present a program entitled "The Lucifer Hummingbird in West Texas."  Kelly has spearheaded a banding project at multiple sites aimed at gaining insight into the status, distribution and natural history of hummingbirds in West Texas.  One of his more fascinating subjects has been the Lucifer Hummingbird.  Join us and find out what Kelly's banding studies have revealed about this unique West Texas hummingbird.  Open to the public.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Injured Wild Animal?

 

Have you found an injured wild animal or bird?


DO NOT send an e-mail to us! It may be too late before we can respond.


The Chihuahuan Desert Wildlife Rescue (CDWR) are the people who can help you and you can get more information by clickinghere.

 

All of our field trips and monthly meetings are open to beginners and nonmembers.Smile

 

 

Not a member, but you would like to be? It's easy and not expensive. $15 per year gets you a membership to El Paso/Trans-Pecos Audubon Society. You will receive the Newsletter and your dues help the chapter implement and carry outcommunity and educational activities. The chapter is responsible for the care, upkeep and promotion of FeatherLake as well as providing financial assistance to Rio Bosque Wetlands Park andTexas Audubon Society. The chapter ispresent at Keystone Heritage Park twice a month to assist the public in identification and education of the birds that visit that area. The chapter provides monthly educational and informativeprograms and field trips. If you want to become a member, just fill out the membership form below and mail to: EPTP Audubon, P.O. Box 972441, El Paso, TX 79997 with your check for $15.00. Your support is appreciated. Thank you. El Paso/Trans-Pecos Audubon Local Chapter Membership. Your $15.00 will help support chapter activities and you will receive The Roadrunner delivered to your mailbox. If you would like to save the Chapter the postage, you can request it be delivered to you electronically. Make checks payable to the El Paso/Trans-Pecos Audubon Society.

Name: ______________________________________________________

 

 

Address: ____________________________________________________

City ________________ State ______________ Zip _________

Mail to : EPTP Audubon P.O. Box 972441, El Paso, TX 79997

 

 
El Paso / Trans-Pecos Audubon Society